Quality of Stainless Steel in A4 316: The Basics You Need to Know

The A4 grade of stainless steel is one of the most common and widely used types of steel in the construction industry. Though the term stainless steel is often used interchangeably with the term corrosion-resistant steel, the two terms are not synonymous. Stainless steel is a type of corrosion-resistant steel that is also known as a noble metal. This means that it is less prone to rusting and oxidation than other common steel alloys. However, the term stainless steel is often used synonymously with the term grade 316 (A4). So, what is the difference between these two? And which one is right for you? Read on to find out.

 

Is A4 Stainless Steel Corrosion-Resistant?

The process of creating a stainless steel alloy essentially involves the blending of various types of iron, carbon, and other metals. After this is complete, the metal is heated to a high temperature, cooled down, and then subjected to a special purifying process. The result of this is that the metal becomes almost completely resistant to corrosion and oxidation. This alloy is known as stainless steel and is used in a range of industries. It is used for things like construction, medical equipment, food preparation, etc. However, it is worth noting that there are other types of stainless steel available. The A4 grade of stainless steel, on the other hand, has a minimum yield strength of around 68.8 MPa. This means that it is capable of withstanding a minimum force of about 68.8 MPa.

 

Why is Quality Important?

If you are constructing a bridge or a building, then you will want to make sure that the steel is built to withstand the maximum forces that a building can exert. Thus, you will want to make sure that you choose the ideal grade of steel for the job. Another important reason why you should choose an A4 grade of stainless steel is that it is corrosion-resistant. The carbon content in this grade of stainless steel is very low. The result of this is that it remains free of the carbonyl functional groups that are harmful to humans. These carbonyl functional groups are responsible for the formation of toxic substances like formaldehyde.